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Results of my Twitter experiment

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Ten days ago I began conducting an experiment to test whether I could buy Twitter followers (you can find the base stats for the experiment here).

Well, it worked, and I now have over 60,000 Twitter followers!

The final results.

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Base numbers for my Twitter experiment

StatusPeople fake follower score for @AdamJaffrey 2012.08.17 1245

Here’s a quick update on my experiment to buy Twitter followers. These are the base numbers:

Twitter followers: 284
Klout score: 57.62
StatusPeople fake follower score: 87% good; 11% inactive; and 2% fake

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Buying Twitter followers, the legal and ethical implications

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I’m currently running an experiment in which I’m attempting to buy Twitter followers. I’m doing this for two reasons:

  1. to test whether these purported Twitter follower buying services actually work; and
  2. if I am able to successfully buy followers, to test whether these new (read: fake) Twitter followers will impact my real life, in any way.

I received some interesting feedback in the comments of my previous blog post pertaining to this issue. I’d like to elaborate on some of the issues which were highlighted.

Is buying followers a violation of Twitter’s Terms of Service?

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How $15 will make me the most popular marketing student ever

Twitter followers for @AdamJaffrey 2012.08.16 2304

If money can’t buy happiness, what can it buy?

Studies have shown that money can’t buy happiness. But can it buy popularity? Can it buy influence? These are questions I’m attempting to answer in an experiment I’m running.

So … it turns out you can buy Twitter followers. It’s actually pretty easy. Now, there are a lot of “professional” Twitter follower buying services out there, but I’m opting to lash out on the $5 online marketplace, Fiverr. I chose to use Fiverr for a few reasons:

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How to disable comment moderation in WordPress

How to disable comment moderation in WordPress

Follow these steps to disable comment moderation in WordPress.

In your WordPress admin dashboard, go to:
> Settings > Discussion > Before a comment appears

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Delivering value in the Information Age

Customers have changed.

In the past, sales reps would be tasked with “solution selling“—i.e. being adept at discovering customers’ needs and selling them solutions to those problems. In other words, the sales rep would ask the customer questions to diagnose their problem (need diagnosis) and would “sell” them a product that their company produces which provides a solution to the customer’s problem (need fulfilment).

But in recent times, customers require less help from salespeople to find solutions to their problems. This is likely because:

  1. the wealth of information available to customers has multiplied exponentially;
  2. the access to such information has become ubiquitous [in Western nations] (predominantly due to the internet); and
  3. customers have become increasingly dexterous at researching, curating and analysing information.

The result of these developments is that customers are able to self-diagnose problems and research solutions themselves.

Why does this matter?

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Website redesign

I’m currently redesigning this website, however this has been put on hold due to study commitments. Stay tuned for a snazzy up-to-date site soon!

Facebook wants me back

A little over a week ago I broke up with Facebook. I logged out and deleted the Facebook bookmark from both my PC and my iPhone.
Now, Facebook wants me back.

Productivity lessons from house-sitting

The last time I was house-sitting, all I did was use Facebook and watch TV. I got really bored. Despite cooking, cleaning and looking after the canine (the reason I was required to house-sit) – I had more time to burn than I ever had at home, where a large amount of cooking and cleaning is done for me (thanks mum!).
The reason for this?
When we are in familiar surroundings we fall into behavioural patterns. As creatures of habit, we do the same things again and again. Our brains do this because they’re lazy – they follow patterns so there are less decisions to make throughout the day, limiting cognitive fatigue.
When we are in unfamiliar surroundings the slate is clean. We must actively decide what to eat, do or spend our time on. We decide every element of what we do.
I’m trying to make myself more productive. The next step in this quest is not only limiting distractions, but also breaking the unproductive behavioural patterns I’ve become accustomed to.
How can you break your unproductive habits?

Facebook sabbatical

I waste a lot of time on Facebook. A lot. I’m addicted.
I stop by countless times per day to check for notifications and respond to ‘urgent’ comments on my most recent status.

I heard a quote:

“Time is our most valuable asset, yet we tend to waste it, kill it, and spend it rather than invest it.” ~ Jim Rohn, Business Philosopher

In the interests of being more productive, I’m running an experiment – I’m ditching Facebook for one month. Let’s see:
a) whether I manage without it, and
b) whether I miss it.

But more importantly, there’s a hidden part c) to the equation:
c) what extra will I achieve in that one month?